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Butterflies in the Garden

Plant It and They Will Come

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Monarch
Raising Butterflies
Black Swallowtail
Viceroy
Caterpillars

Spiders, Not Birds, May Drive Evolution of Some Butterflies - Many spectacular patterns that we find in smaller insects may be due to spider pressure rather than bird pressure. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130312102547.htm#.UUCGdYnG1og.email


Overwintering Larvae's Body Must Remain Fluid - Due to our critters genetic makeup, our larvae, like other insects, must rely on external sources to provide their heat, or hold or attract it (referred to as ectothermic). In order not to freeze, the larvae's body must remain fluid. Glycerol is the chemical in their body, much like anti-freeze that keeps them from turning to little icicles. Dust, bacteria and other things alter the quality and ability of glycerol to do its job, which is one reason our critters "evacuate their gut" just prior to pupating (the mess they leave behind). In our everyday world, ethanol is a liquid with the similar property in its inability to freeze. 

Advanced Butterflying - Learn about nutritional requirements, parasitoids, diseases of viral and fungal origin, and much more can be found here.

Moth Identification- There are several series of plates showing photos of moths to aid you in their identification. There are plates of pinned or museum specimens and also photos of living moths. There is also a section of caterpillar photos. http://mothphotographersgroup.msstate.edu/Plates.shtml


Life cycles of insects -Information on the life cycles of all kinds of insects can be found at www.BugLifeCycles.com.


Global Warming May Reroute Evolution, Milkweed Research Findshttp://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110216171001.htm


Ting Ears Found on Butterfly Wings- To read this story click on http://www.livescience.com/animals/091026-butterfly-ears.html.